Breaking misconceptions: Makeup doesn’t make a person

Junior Jacob Goss volunteered to put makeup on half of his face to show the changes makeup make.
Junior Jacob Goss volunteered to put makeup on half of his face to show the changes makeup make. “We’re not supposed to care about how we look,” Goss said, who is impartial to the idea of makeup being asexual. “But in all reality we do care if we look okay or not, we worry about it-we’re just not supposed to show it.”  Photo by Sierra Rehm

“We’re not supposed to care about how we look,” junior Jacob Goss said, who is impartial to the idea of makeup being asexual. “But in all reality we do care if we look okay or not, we worry about it-we’re just not supposed to show it.”

There are several common misconceptions about makeup in today’s society. One states that makeup completely falsifies how a woman looks, as if a drop of foundation will change the bone structure of the face. Youtube stars and professional makeup artists add to this misconception with their stunning work, like changing themselves into other characters or celebrities. This is one reason that boys may get the idea that the girl they see in school  may look nothing like the girl at home without makeup.

Most of those professionals spent years in cosmetology school and take hours to perfect a single look. A large majority of high school girls spend under 15 minutes applying makeup in the morning. Also a survey on smartgirl.org shows that only 42 percent of girls even wear makeup on a daily basis and that often only consists of foundation, mascara and lipgloss. Those combined won’t be able to come close to a professional makeup artist.

[pullquote]I wear makeup because it makes me feel good about myself.  I put eyeliner on every morning because it makes me feel confident and I like it. That’s all.” ~Senior Julia Beffery[/pullquote]

Some girls are exceptionally skilled with makeup and know just how to make their eyes pop or their cheekbones stand out, but those girls are few and far between.

Another misconception is that women wear makeup to impress others; mainly that women only wear makeup to seduce a boy through appearance.

The same survey shows that 35 percent of girls agree that girls wear makeup for themselves, not for boys. For some, “wearing makeup for yourself,” means more of wearing makeup to fit in with their peers.

A third and final misconception with makeup is that it should only be reserved for women, when it is very probable that makeup can be used as an asexual tool. Makeup take a connotation of it being feminine and most guys would turn away at the idea, in fear of losing masculinity. Men using makeup seems to only be reserved and acceptable for men who take the stage in a performance. If they want, boys of any age should be able to wear makeup.

 BELOW: Gull Lake students volunteer to show that makeup doesn’t really change the way you look. They did normal makeup on only half of their face. Photos taken by Sierra Rehm

 

 

 

Sierra Rehm

Sierra Rehm

Hi, it’s Sierra here. I have been a member of the Gull Lake community for my lifetime so far. I have always lived, learned, and grown in the Richland area. This year is my Senior year at Gull Lake and my third and final year as a staff member on the Reflection. My time working on the paper has not only evolved my skill and grown my passion for writing and reporting, it has heightened my sense of school spirit. For the past two years I have contributed as the staff video editor, as well as feature and entertainment editor; which means I monitor and edit articles within those areas on the website. In total I have won three MIPA awards within the two prior years on staff,(first, honorable mention, and third) all of which involve video production. I spend the rest of my time doing school work, writing for personal enjoyment, working, or spending time with friends.

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